Resources 

Videos

Facing the Truth: A Case for Reparations

Bill Moyers speaks with Ta-Nehisi Coates, a senior editor for The Atlantic, about his cover story on why America needs to reconcile with its racist past.  See the A Case for Reparations Here...

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Deconstructing White Privilege with Dr. Robin DiAngelo

Dr. Robin DiAngelo is the author of "What Does it Mean to Be White? Developing White Racial Literacy" has been an anti-racist educator for over two decades.  In this video she unpacks the term “white fragility,” a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress triggers a range of defensive moves including anger, fear, and guilt.  While she addresses this video to "White People to help them overcome those defensive moves, the content is helpful for everyone working  overcome racism in America.  

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A Tale of Two Schools

Aljazeera spent a day in the life of two U.S. high school students on both sides of the education divide. Here's their story in their own words.

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The Most Significant Leagacy of American Slavery

Professor Melissa -Harris-Laceqwell, Princeton University explains how the 'Electoral College' is to most serious Legacy of American slavery

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Books 

When Affirmative Action was White by Ira Katznelson

October 24, 2016

When Affirmative Action Was White elaborates on this core theme in four stages. First, the author looks at how African Americans were denied access to economic relief during the New Deal. Although many federal officials understood that black sharecroppers were the hardest hit group during the Great Depression, a full 65 percent of African Americans were denied access to social security benefits, government grants, elderly poor assistance, and unemployment insurance. Administered by local politicians throughout the South, New Deal relief programs were simply not given to the vast majority of African Americans. The result was the deepening of black rural poverty.

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The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

October 24, 2016

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness is a book by Michelle Alexander, a civil rights litigator and legal scholar. The book discusses race-related issues specific to African-American males and mass incarceration in the United States, but Alexander notes that the discrimination faced by African-American males is prevalent among other minorities and socio-economically disadvantaged populations. Alexander's central premise, from which the book derives its title, is that "mass incarceration is, metaphorically, the New Jim Crow..

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More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City, By William Julius Wilson

October 27, 2016

Preeminent sociologist William Julius Wilson explains a groundbreaking new framework for understanding racial inequality, challenging both conservative and liberal dogma.

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